Ramesh and Jesus

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I was tired from 16 hours of travel and hadn’t been to bed in 30 hours, but my conversation with Ramesh was a highlight of our recent mission trip to Asia. Ramesh was our Uber driver who took us home from the Portland airport after our extended mission trip. He lives in Vancouver, WA where our NWBC offices are located. He lives 15 minutes from our home. And he needs Jesus as much as anyone we met in Myanmar or Japan.

Ramesh was born in Fiji, but he has lived in the United States for 32 years. When I asked him about his life here he said that things weren’t going well for him and that he was considering changing his religion to see if a new religion would bring him a better life. I asked him what his religion was and he said that he is a Hindu. I said, “What new religion are you considering?” He said that he thought he might become a Christian. I said, “How do you become a Christian?” He said, “By getting baptized.”

I told Ramesh that I am a Christian, and I asked him if I could share what the Bible says about becoming a Christian. He welcomed my offer and I began by sharing John 3:16. I said, “Ramesh, according to the Scriptures Christianity is different than religions. Christianity is about coming to know Jesus Christ and inviting Him into your life.” We discussed the Bible’s teaching on sin, repentance and faith. We talked about the uniqueness of Jesus as the One who is fully God and fully man, truly the Lord of all.

After about 15 minutes we arrived at our house. I said, “Ramesh, would you like to pray right now and invite Jesus to come into your life as your Lord and Savior?” He said, “I want to think about it some more.” I asked if he had any more questions. He didn’t, and then I encouraged him to pray and ask God to speak to him. I gave him a card with my email and phone number and asked him to call me. I said, “I think God brought us together tonight Ramesh.” He agreed. He even carried some of our bags into house. I prayed for him, and then he left.

That’s been two weeks and I haven’t yet heard from Ramesh. But I’ve thought about him and have prayed for him. And, in a way, I think Ramesh was a reminder from God to me that I am surrounded by people who need Jesus right here in the Northwest. Like Ramesh, they may think baptism makes a person Christian. Many of our neighbors haven’t rejected Jesus outright. They simply don’t know the gospel of Jesus’ life, death, burial, resurrection, ascension and coming again.

Ramesh seemed genuinely grateful that I had shared Jesus with him. It seemed like he was hearing things for the very first time … the first time. I wonder, how many are waiting to learn the truth about Jesus for the very first time? More than we know, I expect. Most are open to a genuine conversation about faith and God and forgiveness and grace. Not a sales pitch, but a conversation, from the heart, with expectancy, but a conversation just the same.

It’s been said before, but I do think many unbelievers in the Northwest have rejected, or ignored, a “form of religion” that they think is true Christianity. We need many, many conversations with our friends. Conversations that focus on gospel truths, spoken with uncommon grace, bathed in God’s love.

Make Disciples: Part 3 – Discipling a Church

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Parts 1 and 2 of “Making Disciples” focused on discipling the nation and the community. In Part 3 the focus is the local church, which is the means God uses to disciple individuals, a community and a nation. A community becomes more Christian when local churches take the gospel to their community, love their community, and lead the individuals in their community to Christ. But for this to happen there must be a church in the community that behaves “Christianly.” What does it mean to behave Christianly and how does a church do it?

Jesus’ command in Matthew 28:19 to “disciple all of the nations” is followed by two actions steps – baptizing them and teaching them to observe everything Christ commanded. Baptism is the public act of identifying with Jesus Christ and His church. In the New Testament, baptism followed immediately after one’s personal profession of Jesus Christ as Lord. Making disciples begins with gospel witness (evangelism) by which individuals, and sometimes entire households, come to profess the Lordship of Jesus Christ and follow Him in believer’s baptism.

Following baptism, making disciples is described by the phrase “teaching them to observe” all of the commands that Jesus gave to the eleven remaining disciples (Matt. 28:20). Those who commit to Christ must learn to obey all of the teachings of Jesus. Now, here’s an observation: many churches are better at teaching the meaning of the Scriptures than teaching obedience to the Scriptures. In sermons and Bible lessons the “What?” is often taught, but not the “Now what?”

So how do church leaders teach the church to obey Christ commands? You can do so by doing these three things.

1. Destiny – Teach every believer that he/she has a purpose in God’s kingdom. Every person “in Christ” has a destiny, a reason for being and a role to fulfill in the Body of Christ. Every person matters. Throughout the New Testament we see this, and God’s people must be taught to read the Scriptures with a view to discovering their own purpose in God’s work. Every believer has spiritual gifting and therefore each has a purpose in what God is accomplishing in the world. The purpose of the church, and of each believer, must be addressed from the pulpit monthly at the very least. It must be taught in small groups. And we must teach our children, in the home, and in the church, that they have a destiny to fulfill in God’s kingdom.

2. Opportunity – Provide the church with opportunities to obey the teachings of Christ. With varying degrees of effectiveness, churches provide opportunities to worship, to contribute to God’s work financially, to walk with God’s people in unity, and to serve God through the ministries of the church and in their daily lives. But some churches are much better at giving people specific opportunities to answer the question “Now what?” Every sermon and Bible lesson should answer this question. The programing and ministry of the church should provide opportunities for God’s people to “do acts of obedience.” Things like evangelism training and sharing the gospel, mission projects, serving widows, and serving the poor and needy, help give opportunities for God’s people to obey Him. Church leaders should regularly ask the question, “How can we show God’s love to our community? How can we take the gospel to our community and to peoples beyond?” These questions will lead to opportunities for serving God (talk to civic and school leaders to get a better understanding of community needs). Also, don’t forget to provide opportunities to celebrate what God does and to pray for God to work through the opportunities provided by the church. How much praying does your church do on Sunday morning that focuses on loving the community and sharing Christ? Are you giving your people opportunities to pray for community leaders, pray for the lost, pray for missionaries, and pray for the persecuted church? Each local church needs to connect with the worldwide church through prayer. A small church can have a huge impact by praying for big things.

3. Responsibility – Lead each of God’s people to take personal responsibility for answering the call to love God and to love their neighbors. Each believer needs to take responsibility for God’s work. Opportunities provided must be seized by God’s people as they take personally the task of sharing Christ with the lost and loving their neighbors.

From a programming perspective, individual churches will address these three things in different ways. But think about those in the Scriptures whom God has greatly used. Think about those throughout history, and even those you know personally through whom God has done great things. Each of these people had a sense of destiny. Each of them created and seized opportunities. And each of them took personal responsibility for serving God. A church that leads its people to do these things will become a dynamic church, greatly used of God, no matter its numerical size.

Give Me a Good Map

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Every week I use the Global Positioning Satellite system (GPS) to get me where I need to be. Most of you are familiar with GPS and you use it too. It’s quite remarkable when you consider how it works and the accuracy of the system. Missionaries even use GPS to pinpoint remote church locations where roads don’t exist.

As much as I appreciate GPS, it hasn’t completely replaced a good map. My favorite map is the National Geographic Atlas of the World. Its 138 pages contain maps on world climate, population, and food. There are even energy and minerals maps, as well as maps of the moon, the solar system, and the heavens, together with the standard maps you would expect.

The reason I like maps is because they help put my location in perspective. When I look at a map I can see where I am, where I’ve been, and where I’m going. On a map I can view the totality of my travels and pinpoint special places along the journey. Maps give a perspective that GPS can’t give.

As Christians we have a perspective that unbelievers don’t have. The Bible provides us this perspective by giving us the roadmap of history. We know how things started and how things will end. We know that Jesus Christ stands at the center of history. This means that the purpose of life, and even daily happenings, find ultimate meaning in their relationship to what God is doing and has done through Jesus Christ.

For example, as soon as the Fall took place in the Garden of Eden, God directed man’s mind to the coming of Jesus by promising that the seed of the woman would crush the serpent’s head (Gen. 3:15). From this beginning, the Bible unfolds God’s plan in Christ, revealing His will and purpose through the Old Testament prophets, the New Testament revelation, before the end of history when Jesus Christ returns.

Because Jesus provides us with perspective and purpose in daily living, Hebrews tells us to keep our eyes on Jesus as we run the race of life (Heb. 12:1f). Jesus enables us to “stay on our feet” and continue moving forward with Him, even as we navigate life’s daily trials.

Contrast the perspective that Jesus gives the believer with that of those who don’t know Christ. For the unbeliever, history is going nowhere and life is absurd because there is no perspective-point, and thus no way to place the events of the day into history’s purpose. We see this reflected in our media, and especially in our news, where the focus is on the politics of the moment or the sporting event of the week. For the unbeliever, life is about tragedies and triumphs, ups and downs, but without the perspective of the Bible, and without finding one’s center in Jesus Christ, it all becomes meaningless.

Without Jesus, life is only about winning and losing, and we all ultimately lose in the end. Some lose by virtue of the situation into which they are born. Would you like to be born a girl in ISIS controlled Syria? You’re in trouble from day one. Or what if you were born infirmed in India, where karma teaches that handicapped people are suffering for misdeeds in a past life? For the unbeliever, the best that can be hoped for is that I might have a little peace and happiness during my days “under the sun” (born an American, for example), but there is no ultimate purpose in this. Without Jesus I have no roadmap in which I can place my life’s journey in the context of the entire earth and all of history. I only have GPS coordinates. I know where I am, but where I am has no connection with the past or the future, and do I even have a future?

What does this mean for us? It means that we must keep our eyes on history’s champion, Jesus Christ, and not get derailed by the politics of the moment or the passing pleasures of sin. Love your neighbor. Be a blessing to your city. Demonstrate in word and deed that God’s plan in Christ is history’s great story. Jesus was and is and always will be. Kings come and go, but King Jesus will prevail. Indeed, He already has! As Paul wrote from the dungeon, shortly before his death, “I know whom I have believed, and am persuaded that He is able to guard what has been entrusted to me until that day” (2 Tim. 1:12).

What of Those who will never claim the Prize?

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I’ve been reading through Deuteronomy the last few weeks during my morning devotional time. This amazing book records Moses’ final spoken words to Israel before his death. It is rich with content and contains a powerful message for us today, multiple messages really. But one that has stayed with me for many days is Moses’ plea to God that he be allowed to enter the Promised Land. In Deuteronomy 3:23-28 we read that Moses “begged the Lord … please let me cross over and see the beautiful land on the other side of the Jordan…. But the Lord was angry with me … and would not listen to me. The Lord said to me, ‘That’s enough! Do not speak to me again about this matter’ … But commission Joshua and encourage and strengthen him, for he will cross over ahead of the people and enable them to inherit this land.”

There is great emotion and sadness in this story. For 40 years Moses had led God’s people. With humility and faithfulness he led them and prayed for them and protected them. But in the end, only two men above the age of 20 when they left Egypt were allowed to enter the Promised Land – Joshua and Caleb. All the others died. The wilderness was littered with their corpses for 40 years. Then, when all above age 60 were dead, save Joshua and Caleb, Joshua led Israel into the Promised Land.

A question that came to me is this: What did God do in Israel during those 40 years in the Wilderness? One thing He did was enable those who died to prepare the generation that would conquer and claim the land. Moses and the others fathered children, multiplied their numbers, then raised them, taught them, trained them, made disciples of them. They taught the younger generation to trust God and follow God. Moses taught Joshua leadership skills and built strength into him for the task that was to come. Then, after 40 years of funerals, when the elders were dead, the people were ready to claim God’s promise.

Imagine living your whole life knowing that you will never achieve your dreams. You will never have what God had wanted to give you, if only you had remained faithful to Him. That was the situation that Moses and the elders faced. Their sinfulness and rebellion caused them to miss a tremendous blessing. And when it did, their purpose became that of preparing their children to claim the blessing.

No one knows what tomorrow holds for any of us. But I do know this, if Jesus’ return is delayed for another decade, or century, or millennium, nothing we do is more important than making disciples of the next generation of God’s people. When I think of the lostness of the Northwest, I think of the little ones who don’t have moms and dads teaching them to love Jesus. I think of college students, 625,000 of them in the Northwest, most of whom are giving no thought as to what God wants for their life.

Whatever we are doing, we had best do all we can to teach our children and grandchildren how to walk with God, and we’d best teach the neighbor kids how to walk with God as well. Our schools and universities are mission fields. We may not live to see the next Great Awakening , the Day of the Lord, or the Glorious Day, in which case our greatest work may be the investment we make in those whom God will use on that Day.

As I see it, that was the task of those whom Moses led out of Egypt. That’s what God did through them. They lived and died so that others could conquer.

Last week I read an excellent biography of Thomas Jefferson titled American Sphinx by Joseph Ellis. One thing that Ellis noted was that the remarkable leadership of the Founding Fathers was due in part to “the self-conscious sense that the future was watching,” thus it “elevated the standards and expectations of all concerned. At least in a small way, we are complicitous in their achievement because we were the ultimate audience for their performances” (p. 300f).
As parents, pastors, leaders, it will serve us well to remember that the future, and God, are watching what we do. It is also comforting, in a way, to know that we have a part to play in the great drama of building God’s Kingdom, even if our part is preparing those who themselves will claim the promise.

The Prison Outhouse was the Only Place We Could Worship

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Something that I regularly do is check a couple of websites for articles on the persecution of Christians. One site is http://www.persecution.org and another is http://www.opendoorsusa.org. Today I read an article on Open Doors (an organization founded by Brother Andrew for those of you who remember him) that I thought I would repost to my blog.

For those of you who are pastors or Bible teachers, I highly recommend that you check sites like these. On them you will learn some of what is happening with and to believers worldwide. You will also read stories that you can share with your church. When we read such stories it helps us to put things in better perspective. It is so easy to get bothered by things that, in the end, are trivial or silly when compared to what Christians are facing elsewhere. So the article below comes from Open Doors and the author is Emily Fuentes, dated January 13, 2016.

Hea Woo’s Story

The sharp, cold wind blew through the prison cell, but Hea Woo could hardly feel it… she could hardly feel anything. “I was within hours of death; sick, malnourished and frozen from the deplorable conditions of the prison cell,” shared Hea Woo. “I didn’t think I would be alive to be used by God. I didn’t think I would ever see the outside of the prison cell.”

But then something happened that would change Hea Woo’s life and the lives of many fellow prisoners. “I felt God stir a fire in my heart to share the gospel with others in prison.”

Hea Woo knew that this was impossible for many reasons; The prison guards were capable of murdering anyone who shared about Christianity. And she also didn’t know which prisoners would report her if she did share the gospel message.

For three long days, Hea Woo tried to ignore the calling God had placed on her heart. But after three days she could ignore it no longer, as God had given her very specific instructions.

“Share your cornmeal with another prisoner.” It did not seem like much, but when Hea Woo gave her cornmeal to a fellow prisoner, she literally gave them life. “I realized that was my calling- to bring life to those who were dying. By giving my own food, I was able to give them life and make a sacrifice of my own. This opened up many possibilities to share about Christ.”

One by one more and more prisoners were interested in hearing about Christ, as they were amazed by Hea Woo’s sacrifice. She had to be wise about the best ways to minister to others and the safest place to fellowship, so she prayed for guidance.

“God placed it on my heart: The outhouse of the prison was the only place we could worship.” And so they worshipped God in the most lowly and unlikely place. In that outhouse, they were free to fellowship and worship, even though they were in prison in North Korea.

After several years, Hea Woo was able to leave North Korea, but the mark she left is still felt in the country. God used her to bring several people to Christ, heal many and start several house churches.
Today, more than 50,000 to 70,000 Christians remain in North Korean prison camps. Learn more about how you can help these believers.

*Representative names to protect persecuted Christians

Suggestions for Churches Concerning Refugees and Immigrants

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On Tuesday of this week the Los Angeles school district cancelled classes in all 900 of its schools because of a terroristic threat. This comes less than two weeks after 14 people were murdered during an office Christmas party in San Bernardino, CA in a terrorist act in which one of the perpetrators was a recent immigrant to our nation via a fiancé visa program. The Disney Resorts, and others too, are revamping their security procedures, which will include various methods of detecting weapons and bombs. These acts and actions followed significant political debate on whether the United States should accept Syrian refugees who have fled the murderous chaos in their country. The ongoing political debate regarding terrorism and immigration is exacerbated by the fact that we are in the midst of a presidential election.

I have noticed that issues such as these are often discussed in our churches, and sometimes they are addressed from the pulpit. Pastors and Bible teachers struggle with whether to address some of the hot issues of the day, and, if they do address them, they wrestle with how to speak to such matters. I do not claim to have all of the answers, but I’d like to offer some suggestions that I pray are helpful when addressing the various issues surrounding immigration, including the immigration of Syrian refugees and others from predominately Islamic nations.

First, the people who attend our churches and Bible classes do not attend to hear what the pastor or Bible teacher “thinks” about the issues of the day, they come to hear what God’s Word says about the issues. That doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t address the hot issues of the day from the pulpit. I believe that we must do so, and that failure to do so can make us less relevant. But we are not called to preach what we think or to express our opinion. We are called by God to preach and teach His Word.

So, regarding the topic of Syrian refugees, or immigration policy in general, I would suggest that we address the believer’s responsibility concerning newcomers to our community, and the churches responsibility to make disciples of all nations. Whether certain peoples should be allowed into our country, and how many should be allowed into our country, is a political issue that cannot be addressed with biblical specificity or authority (Should we admit 10,000? 100,000? 10,000,000? Zero? Do you have a Bible verse for this?). There are biblical principles regarding the role of the state and her leaders, but the specific application of the principles to the Syrian refugee crisis moves into the area of opinion and politics very quickly.

Furthermore, the local church and the individual believer have little to no effect on how the matter is resolved nationally. I may have an opinion, but what difference does my opinion really make (my vote will be partly based on my opinion, but my sermon won’t be)? That said, the local church and individual believer can have a huge impact on a particular immigrant family that moves into their community. On this the Bible is clear: we are to love our neighbors, love our enemies, and share the gospel with them. The political questions concerning immigration can be debated, but the responsibility of the church to the “stranger in our midst” is not something up for debate. We are to love them and share Jesus with them. In this way, we are not preaching what we “think,” we are declaring and doing what God’s Word says about the matter. Therefore, we should separate what we “think” about proper immigration policy from how we respond to the immigrant that moves next door.

Second, churches do not exist merely to grow their ministry. Churches are intended by God to bring the transforming message of Christ to their neighborhood, their city, and to the nations beyond. The migration and immigration of peoples often presents churches a unique opportunity to plant new churches in their city, churches that are better equipped to reach immigrant communities.

Last week I received a message from one of our newest churches that an immigrant family was arriving in our area. This family speaks Nepali. Of our 484 churches, we have three that worship in the Nepali language. All three are new churches. All three were formed to reach first generation immigrants from Nepal and Bhutan. And all three were started by our NWBC convention of churches to reach an immigrant people that an English language church couldn’t reach. One of our Nepalese language churches met this new family at the airport, and drawing upon the resources of other churches in our convention (the fruit of cooperation!), they are ministering the love of God to this family. Praise God!

Yesterday I went to my doctor for a minor medical procedure and the physician’s assistant who did the procedure told me that she was an immigrant from Vietnam. She said that she was one of the original “boat people” (the boat people were Vietnamese who fled when South Vietnam collapsed and the Communists took control in 1975). She was eight years old when her family fled. They spent a year in a refugee camp in Malaysia before a church in America sponsored them and brought them to America. She loves the Lord. She loves that church. And she loves America. Her story brought back memories for me, when, as an eighth grader, I taught English to two Vietnamese boys who were “boat people.” They were the only Vietnamese family that moved to Whitefish, MT. They were welcomed into our school and community. They worked hard, and they did well.

Third, invite an immigrant family into your home and get to know them. Only 25 percent of immigrants are ever invited into the home of an American. When they are, they feel greatly honored. This week, I connected a Chinese family in Beijing, China to an American friend who lives there. The Chinese family was neighbors of ours for about 9 months in Oklahoma City. We met them the day they arrived from China. We invited them to our home for dinner, and they invited us to theirs. We shared Christ with them, gave them a Bible, and loved on their little boy. They moved to Singapore and we moved to the Northwest. But we have kept touch via Facebook. He’s been reading the Bible. The family has taken a huge step toward Jesus. I don’t know if they are there yet, but when they decided to move to Beijing, they asked if I could connect them with a church there. And so I have. What a blessing! It began with dinner in our home.

There are serious political issues and questions that are being debated in our nation. I don’t have much control over what will happen nationally and politically. But I have a lot to say about the immigrant next door. What to do about them is a question easily answered. I am to love them, welcome them, pray for them, and share Jesus with them. On a day soon to come, there will be people from every nation worshipping our Lord. I hope our Chinese neighbors are in that number. I hope the family that arrived from Nepal last week is in that number. I hope your neighbors are in that number as well.

Are All Sins Equal?

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Are all sins equal? Do different sins carry differing consequences? These questions have long been discussed, and answers have been suggested, perhaps none more creatively than that of Dante Alighieri in his 14th Century classic, Inferno.

In a frightening description of Hell, Dante imagined that different sins merited different levels of punishment, with the worst reserved for three particular traitors. Dante pictured the devil as having three horrible faces, and in each of the devil’s mouths there is a sinner. In the left and right mouths hang Brutus and Cassius, who murdered Julius Caesar in the Roman Senate. Brutus and Cassius appear with their heads pointed out and their feet inside the devil’s mouth. In the center mouth, lodged headfirst, with his twitching legs protruding from the devil’s mouth, is the betrayer of Jesus Christ, Judas Iscariot. The devil chews on his victims, continually, and throughout eternity, tearing the traitors to pieces, but never killing them.

Dante certainly had a vivid imagination! And though there is no biblical support for the details of his description of hell, the issues of differing consequences for various sins does find support in the Bible. The Bible shows that God does consider some sins to be worse than others. Some sin brings greater guilt than others. And some sins do us more damage than others.

First, consider the sin that Jesus calls “unforgiveable.” In Matthew 12:31-32 Jesus said, “I tell you, people will be forgiven every sin and blasphemy, but the blasphemy against the Spirit will not be forgiven. Whoever speaks a word against the Son of Man, it will be forgiven him. But whoever speaks against the Holy Spirit, it will not be forgiven him, either in this age or in the one to come.” Resistance to the witness of the Holy Spirit about the person and work of Jesus Christ rules out the possibility of faith and repentance. No sin is more tragic and lethal than this.

Second, consider the sin that brings death. In 1 John 5:16-17, John tells the church to pray for a brother whom you see committing a sin, but only if it is a sin that “does not bring death.” John says, “There is sin that brings death. I am not saying he should pray about that.” Commentators have long debated the nature of the sin leading to death. Quite possibly it is the same sin that Jesus referenced as the unforgiveable sin. Whether this is so, clearly the text indicates that some sin is less consequential than others (or than one other).

Third, the Scriptures often indicate that different sins bring different consequences. Moses told the Israelites that their sin in worshipping the golden calf was a “great sin,” one of the consequences of which was a plague sent by God (Ex. 32:30-35). In 2 Samuel 12:7-23 we read of the terrible consequence that David suffered after his sin with Bathsheba and the murder of her husband Uriah. The consequence included the death of his son conceived in adultery. In Luke 12:41-48 Jesus speaks of varying levels of punishment based on the level of knowledge a steward has. Jesus also said that whoever causes the downfall of a child who believes in Him, “it would be better for him if a heavy millstone were hung around his neck and he were drowned in the depths of the sea” (Mt. 18:6).

Fourth, we see in Scripture that deliberate and willful rebellion against God can bring greater levels of consequence. Romans 1:18-32 indicates an increasing level of depravity in human beings as God gives them over to the consequences of sin. In Matthew 18:15-17 Jesus says that if a brother sins against another, and he refuses the increasing levels of accountability brought by the church, that he will ultimately be treated like an unbeliever. In 1 Cor. 5 Paul said to “turn over to Satan” a particular brother who was stubborn in his sin.

Because Jesus Christ forgives and cleanses us of all our sin when we place our faith in Him and experience salvation, we are tempted to disregard our continued sin and how God might deal with it. Moreover, because all have sinned against God, and because the “wages of sin is death,” (Rom. 6:23), we sometimes fail to consider that the consequences of our sin can vary, both in this life, and in the life to come. Without Jesus Christ, all sinners are spiritually dead and eternally lost. But there are different levels of severity, and consequence, between the sin of sloth and that of mass murder. If a hungry person steals a loaf of bread, he is a sinner and a lawbreaker. But we judge, and I would suggest that God weighs the sin of a sadistic killer, differently than that of the bread thief. Clearly, throughout Scripture, God prescribed more severe consequences for certain sins.

The church is often accused of focusing on certain sins, especially sexual sins. There is validity to this accusation, I’m sure. But there is good reason for the church to warn about sexual sins, and that is because they are frequently committed, and they carry damaging consequences. In 1 Cor. 6 Paul says, “Flee from sexual immorality! ‘Every sin a person can commit is outside the body, but the person who is sexually immoral sins against his own body.’” He goes on to say, “Your body is a sanctuary of the Holy Spirit who is in you” and “You are not your own, for you were bought with a price; therefore glorify God in your body” (1 Cor. 6: 18-20). In this text the Scriptures describe sexual immorality as particularly damaging because of the relationship between the believer and the Holy Spirit. Elsewhere we read of how families, marriages, and children are damaged, even destroyed, through sexual immorality. Dwelling on an immoral thought is sinful, but acting on such thought carries greater consequence, at least in this life.

Again, every person without Jesus is spiritually lost and dead in sin. But this fact does not negate the varying levels of consequences that sins carry. Scripture shows that in God’s estimate some sins do us more damage and produce more weighty consequences. We must learn to think of sin biblically. We must hate sin wholeheartedly, especially where we see it in ourselves. And, we must not succumb to the temptation that many Christians have today, of not recognizing that some sins do more damage than others. Yes, it is true, that we are all sinners. But it is also true that some sin will destroy your relationships, damage your body, and harm your witness for Christ, more than will others. Because of this, all sins are not equal.

One final thought. The reality that some sins are more damaging than others must not produce a judgmental or prideful spirit in those who have refrained from certain sins. Paul’s said, “Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners” – and I am the worst of them” (1 Tim. 1:15). If I regard someone as “worse than me,” or “less than me,” how can I love them in unfeigned humility? I cannot. Therefore, the purpose of this essay is not to help us identify who is worse than whom. The purpose is to help us acknowledge and deal with the sin and guilt in our own lives lest it destroy us. And, a second purpose, is to keep believers from getting wobbly in the knees and winking at the kind of sin that is destroying people’s lives, even while our nation celebrates certain of these sins.