My Commitment to Southern Baptists

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The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) exists for one grand purpose – to advance the Great Commission of Jesus Christ. I am allowing my name to be entered into nomination for the presidency of the SBC because I believe that we need a clear change in direction in order to fulfill our God-given mission and reverse our present course of decline in every key measurement of Great Commission advance.

I grew up in the small town of Whitefish, Montana. There was no Southern Baptist church in my hometown, but when I attended college in Butte, Montana I met a group from the Baptist Student Union (BSU). They reached out to me and it changed my life. By my senior year I was the BSU Director. I was paid a whopping $50 per month to plan the weekly meetings, teach the Bible study, and build a strategy to reach our campus for Christ. It was a wonderful year in which several students came to Christ and we doubled our weekly attendance. Through that experience God called me to preach, and, after receiving my degree in petroleum engineering, my wife and I moved to Fort Worth, Texas to attend Southwestern Seminary.

I reflect on my BSU experience with gratitude that Southern Baptists cooperate to reach the world for Christ. There was no other Christian group on my college campus – only Southern Baptists – and from that I learned that we must cooperate if we are to accomplish big things, particularly big things in out-of-the-way places.

The growth of Southern Baptists was one of the most important religious developments of the 20th Century. With fewer than 2 million members in the year 1900, Southern Baptists experienced annual growth for more than a century, peaking at 16.3 million members in 2006. The International Mission Board grew to a force of 5,600 missionaries serving throughout the world. A network of over 1,100 local Associations and 42 State Conventions was established to serve more than 45,000 churches and their cooperative mission work. The North American Mission Board (formerly Home Mission Board) largely worked through State Conventions and Associations to assist in church starting, evangelism, mission education, disaster relief, and other missions ministries. Added to these, six Southern Baptist seminaries and dozens of colleges and universities with ties to State Conventions were established to train pastors, missionaries, educators, medical personnel, business persons and others. The numerical and institutional strength of Southern Baptists, coupled with prosperity and religious freedom in the United States, enabled the growth of one of the most potent global missionary forces in Christian history.

While Southern Baptists retain considerable ability to impact the world for Christ, we are currently experiencing our greatest challenge. After waging a decades-long battle for the Bible, we are in danger of losing the war we were founded to fight, that of advancing the Great Commission by making disciples and rescuing the captives of the evil one. In the 2010 SBC Annual Meeting in Orlando, FL, messengers narrowly adopted the “Great Commission Resurgence Report,” with the assurance that these recommendations would lead to an evangelistic “resurgence.” What has happened in the decade since? Increasing levels of decline. A clear-headed assessment of Southern Baptist mission efforts reveals the steepest decline in evangelistic effectiveness in our 175-year history. In the past decade baptisms have fallen to a 75-year low, with the last four years being the lowest four years since 1947. New church starts have plummeted over 50 percent in the past decade to at least a 40-year low, with the last four years being the lowest four years in decades, and this while the church planting budget grew from $22 million to $75 million in less than 10 years. Some suggest that church plant numbers prior to 2010 cannot be trusted. Please note, however, that the SBC was experiencing a net increase of a few hundred churches per year in the first decade of the 21st century, and in 2018 we experienced a net decrease of 379 churches and church-type missions. A declining net increase in total churches over the last several years, including our current net decrease in the number of SBC churches, demonstrates a significant decrease in the number of new churches being started.

Other indicators of decline include 1,900 fewer IMB missionaries, 1.5 million fewer church members, and about 15 percent fewer in weekly worship attendance (over 850,000 persons). Cooperative Program (CP) giving, as a percent of the church budget, has continued to decline and is now less than half of what it was in the 1980s. These trends demonstrate that the Great Commission Resurgence has not produced the results for which we had hoped. Sadly, we are experiencing a Great Commission Regression. Leaders must confront these hard realities in order to make necessary changes.

I understand that some think we should not engage in denominational discourse about our present situation. Some believe that the hard realities of our current condition should not be discussed openly because it puts focus on the “negative.” If we do not honestly confront issues others will do so, including those who do not love the SBC like we do. Christians must be able to engage in honest discourse, speaking the truth in love.

Although we are in the midst of a great challenge, there is also immense opportunity. If we recommit to the purpose for which we were birthed – advancing the Great Commission – and couple that with a missiology that empowers those closest to the field of ministry, we can return to an upward path once again. With this in mind, please join me in affirming seven commitments that will strengthen the impact of Southern Baptists for the cause of the Lord Jesus Christ. For the brutal facts to become blessed realities in the years to come, we must:

1. Prioritize the Mission – The SBC was founded to advance the Great Commission of Jesus Christ. Our primary mission must not be compromised by intra-convention politics or pet projects. Secondary issues are not unimportant, and must be addressed at times, but Southern Baptists were founded to advance the mission, not a political agenda.

2. Determine to Cooperate – No single entity or group can accomplish the mission themselves. We must respect and recognize the value that every church, each association and state convention, the Woman’s Missionary Union, Baptist college ministries, and SBC entities bring to the table. People cooperate to the extent of their inclusion and we must start cooperating again. It is a matter of integrity that denominational leaders give strong evidence of cooperation. This includes an impeccable track record of Cooperative Program support which is the primary means by which Southern Baptists fund Great Commission work.

3. Value Every Church – The local church is the body of Christ purchased with the blood of Christ. Whatever its size, the sphere of influence and potential impact of any church is broader than what we can see in a weekend gathering. As such, every cooperating SBC church should be valued, and strategies to increase the engagement of all churches in SBC life must be employed, including use of technology to enable remote access to voting at the Annual Meeting of the SBC. We should not be satisfied with how few of our churches participate in the Annual SBC Meeting. Cooperating SBC churches must not be disenfranchised from participation in the decision-making process because they cannot afford to travel to annual meeting locations.

4. Listen to the Field – Local churches, followed by associations and then state conventions, are closest to the ministry field. Our national SBC agencies should support and work through local and state convention partners, who have local knowledge and for whom the work is most personal because it concerns the eternal destiny of their closest neighbors. There are regional differences within our nation, and within regions there are vast differences from one community to another. Knowing the particulars of a community, as discerned through prayer and local knowledge, is essential to making disciples for Christ and shepherding believers.

5. Operate in the Light – The SBC should be the toughest place to hide corruption, abuse, and poor stewardship, operating at the highest level of integrity and accountability. We must eliminate organizational tools, structures and processes that help hide wrongdoing and abuse. The SBC and its entities should end the use of, and recall, all remaining Non-Disclosure Agreements (NDAs). We must not hide corruption and we will not protect predators at the cost of harming victims. There must be transparency in how we make decisions and how we spend money. Records should be open. Property purchases and ownership should be disclosed and records made available. Annual audits of entities should be open and accessible to Southern Baptist constituents. If we choose to operate in the light, we will maximize the trust and goodwill that are essential to maximizing the Great Commission cooperation of Southern Baptists. Transparency and frank communication regarding challenges and opportunities will build trust and unity in the SBC.

6. Speak Truth – We must love our neighbors and we must speak the truth. There are many lies that are told by the world, and these must be countered by the truth found in God’s Word. Just, righteous leadership engages culture with biblical truth and values, not social or political theories.

7. Believe and Obey God’s Word – We must not compromise obedience to God’s Word in word or deed. The Baptist Faith and Message expresses the biblical beliefs and convictions of Southern Baptists, and it provides the theological parameters within which Southern Baptists work together.

These seven commitments reflect the activity, beliefs and behaviors that made Southern Baptists the missionary force that has taken the gospel of Jesus Christ to tens of millions of persons throughout North America and to the world beyond. Southern Baptists can experience a future brighter than our past, but that is not inevitable. It requires that we put the mission first. It means we must rebuild trust and cooperate in a more complete way. We must love God supremely, and love our neighbor as we love ourselves, with hearts set ablaze by the Holy Spirit. God does not need Southern Baptists to accomplish His mission, but if we are to enjoy God’s favor and remain useful to Him, we must plead for the blessing and smile of our almighty, ever-merciful God. Southern Baptists need nothing more than God. He alone has the power to transform our lives and equip us for His mission.

As we prepare to return to Orlando for the SBC in 2020, these are my seven commitments to you. The challenges that face our convention are too big for any one of us to handle alone. However, through open and honest dialog concerning the challenges that face our convention, we can grow the trust and goodwill which will unite us and maximize our efforts to advance the Great Commission.

Like many of you, I am forever indebted and grateful to Southern Baptists and the missionaries we have sent, including those sent to the small city of Butte, Montana. Thank you Southern Baptists!

Randy Adams
Executive Director-Treasurer
Northwest Baptist Convention

Shine the Light – Building Trust in a Scandal-Plagued World

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“Let us behave decently, as in the daytime” (Romans 13:13a).

We all know that sin thrives in darkness. “Nothing good happens after midnight,” parents warn their kids. But it’s not only physical darkness that provides a covering for sin. Governments, corporations, and even Christian ministries are prone to corruption and various forms of wrongdoing when they operate “in the dark.” What does it mean to operate in darkness if you’re a ministry organization? It means to function without transparency and accountability.

The Northwest Baptist Convention (NWBC), which I serve, has a Board of Directors, established by messengers from NWBC-affiliated churches at our annual meeting. I am accountable to these churches through the Board they have established. The NWBC is a ministry of the churches, established by the churches, so that together they can advance the Great Commission. As such, it is vital that the Executive Director and the NWBC staff maintain the trust and goodwill of our churches. How do we do that?

First, NWBC Executive Board members are trained to understand that their primary job is to hold the executive director and staff accountable to do what we have determined to do as a convention of churches. While I’m called to provide leadership to our convention ministries, I am accountable for how I lead. Sometimes board members in the Baptist world think their primary job is to represent the convention or entity to the churches, but that is not the way the trustee system is designed to work. At every level of Southern Baptist life, board members must represent the interest of the churches to the conventions and agencies. This requires proper training, and it requires that board members be reminded of their responsibility.

Second, the NWBC maintains transparency on the budget, income and expenses. We do this in six primary ways. First, the NWBC Board of Directors is involved in composing the budget and meets corporately to discuss and vote to recommend the budget to NWBC messengers at the annual meeting. Second, the annual budget is discussed and adopted by messengers at the annual meeting. Third, the full executive board receives monthly income and expense reports from the NWBC business manager. Fourth, the Cooperative Program contributions of every participating church is reported in each issue of the NWBC Witness. Fifth, salary structures for each NWBC staff position are adopted by the NWBC Board. Sixth, and importantly, specific budget information, including income and expenses, is available to any participating NWBC church and church member. For example, if a pastor or church member wants to know how much is spent in a ministry area, that information is provided.

Third, the NWBC has policies regarding sexual harassment and abuse, and we do not use nondisclosure agreements, or non-disparagement agreements (NDAs), to hide or cover-up abuse or immoral behavior. In fact, we do not use NDAs, period. No employee or former employee has been asked to sign any agreement that prevents them from speaking privately or publicly. Personally, I have never, in 36 years of ministry, asked a staff member to sign an NDA, nor have I ever signed one. Often money is used to entice a person to sign an NDA. In my opinion, this damages trust and goodwill because it lacks transparency and sends the message that something needs the “cover of darkness.”

Fourth, performance reports and long-term trends are provided and are available. Ministry organizations like to promote and provide good news. Of course we do! We all like good news. But the performance of organizations funded by the freewill gifts of God’s people should be made public and explained, whether the information is encouraging or not. Ministry methods and strategies must always be open for discussion. We don’t debate the veracity of Scripture, but interpretation and application are a different matter. Baptists believe we must advance the Great Commission, but how we best do that, and how well we are doing that, is something that requires continual discussion.

Transparency requires that every decision made, and every dollar spent, must be open to scrutiny. Secrecy erodes trust and trust is essential for an organization to thrive. This has always been true, but in a scandal-plagued world, where ministry leaders fail and fall frequently and publicly, it is essential that we go the extra mile, and then some, to protect our ministries, reputations, and, most importantly, the name of Christ.

I am grateful that the NWBC has enjoyed six continual years of growth in mission’s giving through the Cooperative Program, and that baptisms, church starts, and the number of affiliated churches have all grown as well. We now have more than 500 affiliated churches. Our East Asia partnership has proven highly successful as hundreds of Northwest Baptists have served in East Asia, and some have moved to East Asia to serve long-term. We do not take these Great Commission advances for granted. As servants and stewards of our Lord and His churches, trustworthiness is essential if we are to continue enjoying the confidence of God’s churches.

When We All Get Together

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In July of 1977 our extended family gathered at the Alacca Bible Camp near Harpster, Idaho on the Clearwater River. My great-grandmother, Arvella Adams, was 85 years old, and her nine surviving children (she birthed ten), gathered with their families for the only Adams family reunion of my childhood. There were 85 of us; cousins and uncles and aunts, grandparents too. Some of us were close and saw each other frequently. Others met at the reunion. But we were all part of Grandma Arvella’s family and that was enough reason to gather. I remember it as a fun weekend, with food, games and stories. The following month some of us gathered again, only this time it was for the funeral of my 14-year-old brother, Mitch. None of us knew in July what August would bring.

Next week several hundred Northwest Baptists will gather at the Great Wolf Lodge in Ground Mound, WA. On Monday we’ll enjoy a Great Commission Celebration, followed by our Annual Meeting on Tuesday and Wednesday. We’ll conduct a little business on Wednesday morning, but much of what we will do is worship together, learn some of what God is doing through us, gather information that will strengthen our ministries, catch up with old friends and make a few new ones.

The churches from which we will gather are located in Idaho, Oregon and Washington. We have 508 affiliated churches and church plants, with about 140 averaging 30 or fewer in worship, 250 averaging 50 or less, and about 90 churches averaging over 100 in weekly attendance. Remarkably, as we cooperate together, our churches, large, medium and small give about $2.85 million to missions through the Cooperative Program, and another $950,000 through cooperative mission offerings internationally, in North America, and in the Northwest.

Over the past year, our cooperative mission efforts enabled us to start 20 new churches in four languages. Additionally, upwards of a thousand from hundreds of churches received training in small group ministry, Bible teaching, VBS, preaching, pastoring, evangelism, worship, disaster relief, chaplaincy, church planting, and missions. Many of our churches engaged in direct mission efforts in Asia and in other parts of the world. In July, 113 Northwest Baptists, from 23 churches, served as volunteers in a Southeast Asia megacity where over 1,100 IMB missionaries and their children gathered for an extended time of retreat and training.

And here’s something you probably haven’t heard about. Ivan Montenegro, who leads our Spanish language church planting, worked with farmers in Northwest Washington to conduct evangelistic meetings among migrant peoples. Ivan describes them as “mini Billy Graham” types of meetings. The farmers were extremely helpful in getting the migrant farm workers to the meetings. And in one glorious Sunday in September, 25 Spanish-speaking pastors baptized 1,500 people! We know of nothing like it ever happening in the Northwest. Many of these migrant workers live in California, Texas and other places, and our Hispanic pastors are working to get them connected to Baptist churches where they live.

When we gather Nov. 11-13, we will celebrate what God has done through us. We’ll spend time reading God’s Word and praying. Children and teenagers will lead us in our public Bible readings. Moms, dads and pastors will lead us in prayer. Several gifted Bible teachers and preachers will bring messages all three days that we gather.
Those who gather will bring expectations and hopes and concerns. These will be met with smiles and tears, praises and prayers. One addition to this year’s gathering is the provision of “soul care,” where pastors, or pastors and wives, can schedule to meet with a fellow pastoral pilgrim whom God has equipped to listen and care for other pastors. This pastoral pilgrim has traversed some difficult trails and I’m so glad he’ll be with us. If you want to schedule a time to meet with Pastor Joe Chambers, click on the following link https://calendly.com/nwbc/soulcare?month=2019-11.

It’s going to be a sweet time, Northwest Baptists. We don’t know what the next month or the coming year will bring for any of us. There will be births and deaths, joys and sorrows, victories and setbacks, but I believe this year’s Northwest Baptist Family Reunion will help prepare us for the year to come.

An Encouraging Word about God’s Work in the Northwest

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In a world where tragedy, scandal, and politics dominate the news, sometimes you need to hear a good, refreshing word. With that in mind, I want to share some of the really good things that have been happening in the Northwest.

As I write, 28 are gathered in our Northwest Baptist Convention (NWBC) building, learning how to serve churches as “transitional pastors.” These are men who’ve spent their lives as pastors, and now they will continue to serve churches that are seeking their next pastor. These men are lifelong learners and in ministry lifelong learning is the “fountain of youth.” It keeps you relevant, effective, and vigorous. Helping church prepare for the next pastor, and find a good pastor, is probably the most important and helpful thing we can do for a church.

This spring a preaching conference served 40 pastors, followed by another on reaching and caring for people (Count the Cost), with about the same number attending. “Count the Cost” is something you’ll be hearing more about as it will help any church regardless of size, location, ethnicity or language. We’ve also had 128 attend children’s ministry and VBS training this spring. Our annual Women’s Summit had 302 women, by far our largest attendance ever. One person told me that she brought a friend who was a Buddhist and she gave her life to Christ at the Women’s Summit!

Our annual Youth Conference had 440 in attendance, with 12 professions of faith. Our NWBC youth ministry leader, Lance Logue, invited two boys playing basketball to join the conference. They said they weren’t there for the conference, but he told them they were welcome to attend. They did, and both boys prayed to receive Christ!

In April we had 247 gather for our annual NWBC Church Planter’s Retreat. This included 58 pastors, 45 wives, and over 100 of their kids. Twenty-two volunteers taught the VBS curriculum to the kids. Languages represented among these church planters included English, Spanish, Korean, Cambodian, Vietnamese, Romanian and Mandarin. And we had four new churches launch on Easter Sunday!

What about Disaster Relief? In April 140 DR volunteers attended a two-day training event, preparing for wherever they might be deployed. If you have a disaster in your area, know that we have people ready to serve. DR chaplains have been called upon in school shootings and other traumatic events.

You are providing all types of leadership training and resources by supporting missions through the Cooperative Program. When people are trained, you are providing the training through the NWBC. When Disaster Relief volunteers are deployed, you are sending them through the commitment of your church to invest in a cooperative mission’s strategy. At our church planting retreat, I told all of our church planters that every cooperating NWBC church is investing in them through Cooperative Program missions giving (and through the Northwest Impact Mission Offering).

I know I’m giving you a lot of numbers, but these numbers represent people, and most of these numbers represent people trained for ministry in our churches – your church! Is it making a difference? Yes! According to our Annual Church Profile information, worship attendance increased in our NWBC churches to 33,433 in 2018, up from 29,412 in 2017. Small group attendance increase to 20,406, up from 18,455 in 2017. Total baptisms reported by our churches were 1,742. This number is down from 1,954 the previous year, but the general trend over five years is up. That said, we must make sharing the gospel a top priority and it is our commitment to help you by providing resources and training yearly.

One final word: please pray for the 115 people from 26 of our NWBC churches who will serve hundreds of IMB missionaries and their children in Asia this coming July.

I hope this brief report encourages you as it does me. It is a good day to serve the Lord in the Northwest!

Chinese Baptist Church, Seattle, a Missions Success Story

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Recently Paula and I attended Chinese Southern Baptist Church (CSBC) in Seattle where we joined them in celebrating 35 years of ministry. Founded by returning missionaries to China in 1984, Pastor Andrew Ng has led the church for more than 30 years. The church was formed by reaching Cantonese speaking people, most coming from Hong Kong. On this day, they baptized six new believers and also had the blessing of recognizing the very first person baptized when the church was founded 35 years ago.

CSBC represents the best of missions in the Northwest. Not only do they continue to reach people for Christ, this church which was begun through the Cooperative Program (CP) giving of Northwest and SBC churches, is now a leader in CP mission giving themselves. They also participate in the Northwest Baptist Convention partnership with our international missionaries (IMB) in Asia.

Of particular interest is that Chinese Southern Baptist Church now has an English language ministry that is larger than its Cantonese ministry. Of the six baptized the Sunday we were there, four worship with the English language congregation and two with the Cantonese congregation. Pastor Matthew Zwitt has led the English language ministry for eight years. Under the wise leadership of Pastor Ng, the church came to understand that as it ages, and the children grow, English would become the preferred language of second and third generation immigrants. Also, an English language ministry has enabled them to reach people beyond the Chinese community. We met people from Vietnam, Japan, China, Taiwan, Macao and the United States, worshiping together in English. Pastor Zwitt speaks only English, with no Cantonese ability. Still, he has learned that culture is broader than language, and he has learned to thrive in a majority Chinese-culture church.

CSBC is successfully transitioning into an English language majority church, which is what most of our immigrant churches must do to remain vibrant and effective into the future. The experience of CSBC is not unique. The Northwest has Korean, Russian, Japanese, Vietnamese, Romanian, Burmese and Spanish majority churches that have strong English-language ministries. In one Vietnamese church, the pastor preaches in both languages, moving back and forth, seemingly without effort, from one language to the next. Most churches have separate worship services for English. One church worships in English, but has small groups in multiple Asian languages. They are taking various approaches, but in their own way, our immigrant churches are seeking to reach people, including their own children, with the message of Jesus Christ.

Sometimes we wonder what our mission efforts accomplish. Missionary work is never easy, but assessment is aided by time, even a lifetime, and by remembering that God has been writing its story all along.

Ministry Guaranteed to Bless Your City

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A sanitation worker in our town was crushed when he was hit by a car and pinned up against the garbage truck. He was horribly injured and our church prayed for him and his family. Following the prayer, a church deacon asked a simple question that ultimately transformed our ministry. Here’s the question: “I wonder if that man has a church that is ministering to him and his family?” We learned that he did have a church and they were doing well by him. But this led to a second question: What about others in our community, who in time of crisis, have no church family? What of those who have no pastor, no Bible class, no ministry and no living testimony of God’s love and care in their life? What about them?

This tragic situation and the subsequent questions resulted in a profound commitment by our church. We determined that we would pray for, and serve as best we could, every family in town touched by tragedy. House fires, car wrecks, crime victims, accidents of various kinds, horrible medical diagnoses; these happened with some frequency in our ministry area of 25,000 people. And when they did, we sent two or three to the home with the simple message, “We’re from First Baptist. We heard what happened. We’re so sorry. We want to pray for you and see if there is any way we can help.”
Sometimes our involvement ended after the prayer and words of love and concern. Other times clothing or food was provided, biblical counseling was provided, a wheel chair ramp was built, among other things. The results included some coming to faith in Christ, goodwill built with the family and friends, and some actually joined our church so that they could be involved in this ministry of care. Our church was known for several things, one of which became, “They’re the church that serves everybody and anybody in time of crisis.”

So here’s a goal that will bless your city: commit to visiting and praying for every person stricken by tragedy. The tragedy doesn’t have to be physical injury. In our local newspaper I read weekly, if not daily, of hardships in families. A local mayor’s portrait was on the front page because he was accused of soliciting sex for money. A grandmother went to prison because she embezzled from her employer. A family was ripped apart when a grandson murdered his grandmother. The list goes on. But questions that a local church needs to ask are, “Does this family have a church? Do they have a pastor? Let’s visit them and pray for them and see how we might show them God’s love.”

When I surrendered to ministry leadership a pastor told me that if I would minister to hurting people I would never lack for ministry opportunities. He was right. But I also learned that I couldn’t do it by myself. I needed to lead our church to organize and to do this in our ministry field.

Often when we discuss ministry goals we talk budgets and baptisms and attendance in public worship and Bible study. These are important matters to consider. But mostly they are the byproduct of other things. Things like leading a church to pray for Kingdom concerns and mobilizing outreach ministries of various kinds. Through ministries like http://www.Pray4EveryHome.org every member of your church can pray for their 100 closest neighbors. Through My316 and God Space you can teach your church how to share the Gospel and minister to people (these are provided to every NWBC church without cost thanks to the generous Cooperative Program missions giving of our churches).

How about this as a goal: We will pray for missionaries, the lost in our community, city and school leaders, and all of the children in town, in every public gathering of our church. That is Kingdom praying –praying for the city, unbelievers, and the missionaries we send and support. If we don’t pray for Kingdom concerns when we gather as church, Kingdom praying won’t happen in the homes of most church members.

Things like this make me excited for the spiritual possibility present in every church. Whether you gather with 20 or 200 on Sunday, these are the kinds of things you can do that will touch heaven and human hearts and will make a difference in your city. God told the people in Jeremiah’s day, living as exiles in Babylon, “Seek the welfare of the city I have deported you to. Pray to the LORD on its behalf, for when it has prosperity, you will prosper” (Jere. 29:7). That is a good word for us, living in a 21st Century Babylon.

2018 A Year of Kingdom Growth in the Northwest

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Twenty-nine new Northwest Baptist (NWBC) churches and a fifth consecutive annual increase in Cooperative Program (CP) missions giving mark continued growth in the mission of NWBC churches. Additionally, the Northwest Impact Missions Offering recorded the largest annual increase in decades, totaling $136,691, or $39,837 above the 2017 offering of $96,854. Growth in numbers of churches and missions giving doesn’t tell us all we need to know about our spiritual health, but they are indicators that our Kingdom footprint in the Northwest is expanding.

First, consider these facts about the 29 new churches (including new church plants, affiliates and campuses). Thirteen new churches are in Oregon and 16 are in Washington. About half of these churches are in the Portland and Seattle metro areas, and half are in other cities and towns. The size of the communities range from a few thousand to hundreds of thousands. Two of the 29 churches worship in the Arabic language, one in Russian, one in Zomi, another in Cambodian, five in Spanish, one in Korean, another in Vietnamese, and 17 in English. That’s new churches in eight different languages, all in one year!

How does this happen? The same way it did in the First Century. Some planted, others watered, and God gave the increase. It takes churches, pastors, and missionaries, all working together, empowered by the Holy Spirit, to see the Kingdom advance, and especially cross-cultural, multi-linguistic, Kingdom advance. We need the SBC system of seminaries and mission agencies; we need churches, associations and conventions, all working together, each doing their part, to effectively and consistently penetrate lostness in the Northwest.

Great Commission work is never accomplished by “me and Jesus and no other.” It’s always Jesus and me and many others. Paul had Barnabas and Timothy and Silas, but he also had the Church at Antioch, later joined by churches in Philippi and Ephesus and many others.

Second, CP missions giving in 2018 totaled $2,849,089, for an increase of $35,863 over 2017. With CP missions decreasing nationally, it is remarkable that we have experienced five consecutive years of growth in the Northwest. This, together with significant growth in our Northwest Impact Mission Offering, puts us in a strong position as we train leaders, start and strengthen churches, and do missions, including Disaster Relief missions, in 2019.

Speaking of missions, please pray about joining your fellow Northwest Baptists in sending a team of 130 people to Asia in July 2019. We will minister to hundreds of our overseas workers and their children. More information about this mission opportunity is included elsewhere in the Witness. Paula and I will be there, as will others from throughout the Northwest. In 2016 we sent 163 from 32 churches, so I’m confident we can do this by God’s grace and through faith in Him.

This is an opportunity for rejoicing, Northwest Baptists, and for giving God praise and glory for the great things He has done. Together we see God working mightily in our day, this good day He has given to us.