Preventing Sexual Abuse in Churches

Standard

On February 3, 2019 the Houston Chronicle newspaper began a 3-part series on sexual abuse issues in Southern Baptist churches. Over a period of 20 years they have identified approximately 220 convicted perpetrators in 47,000 churches — including four from the Northwest — and 700 victims. That number will grow, and has grown, as others have come forward with their stories of abuse.

The damage done to victims of sexual abuse lasts a lifetime, often affecting multiple generations within a family or community, including church communities. Because of this, I want to provide a brief synopsis of the procedures we have in place to assure care for victims and families when it is appropriate, protect our convention, as well as the ways we try to help our churches protect their children and their ministries. This explanation is not exhaustive, but hopefully you will find it helpful.

First, the Northwest Baptist Convention (NWBC) does national criminal background checks on all of our staff. Furthermore, national criminal background checks are performed on all volunteers who work with minors. Every church must do the same. If your church has not done national criminal background checks on every person working with those under age 18, children are placed at risk. Furthermore, the church is at great risk should abuse ever occur. Background checks must be performed on all paid staff and every volunteer who has access to children. You can download from our convention website a document containing links to multiple resources that will help your church become more fully aware and prevent opportunities for abuse to occur. Find it here under the “Safety & Security” heading:

https://www.nwbaptist.org/nwbc-ministries/church-health/children/

Second, the NWBC offers training to our churches multiple times a year on how to protect children and prevent abuse from occurring. Included in this training is a list of resources for conducting criminal background checks, etc. Policy and procedure guidelines are available to all of our churches regarding these matters, upon request. Ashley Seuell, an attorney with the Northwest Baptist Foundation, is available to review a church’s policies and recommend policies and methods that churches can use to protect their children and their church at large.

Third, when moral failure occurs, even if it does not involve criminal behavior, we state publically the reason for termination or resignation (not necessarily the details of the offense, just that it was an issue of moral failure), and we urge that churches do the same. This makes it much more difficult for a sexual offender to move to a new town, or a new state, and resume ministry.

Fourth, we offer to provide Christian counseling to those hurt and injured by sexual immorality and/or abuse.

Fifth, we never suppress or “cover up” information regarding sexual abuse. We have not and will not enter into nondisclosure agreements with any person who separates from the NWBC because of a moral failure (we haven’t entered into nondisclosure agreements for any other reason, either).

I hope you find this information helpful. We live and serve in a broken world populated with broken people. We too have been damaged by sin, most often damaged by our own sin. But those who serve Jesus Christ with integrity of heart make a difference now … and forever. You matter and what you do matters. The church matters. May God help us and protect us as we strive to love Him and love our neighbors.

Ministry Guaranteed to Bless Your City

Standard

A sanitation worker in our town was crushed when he was hit by a car and pinned up against the garbage truck. He was horribly injured and our church prayed for him and his family. Following the prayer, a church deacon asked a simple question that ultimately transformed our ministry. Here’s the question: “I wonder if that man has a church that is ministering to him and his family?” We learned that he did have a church and they were doing well by him. But this led to a second question: What about others in our community, who in time of crisis, have no church family? What of those who have no pastor, no Bible class, no ministry and no living testimony of God’s love and care in their life? What about them?

This tragic situation and the subsequent questions resulted in a profound commitment by our church. We determined that we would pray for, and serve as best we could, every family in town touched by tragedy. House fires, car wrecks, crime victims, accidents of various kinds, horrible medical diagnoses; these happened with some frequency in our ministry area of 25,000 people. And when they did, we sent two or three to the home with the simple message, “We’re from First Baptist. We heard what happened. We’re so sorry. We want to pray for you and see if there is any way we can help.”
Sometimes our involvement ended after the prayer and words of love and concern. Other times clothing or food was provided, biblical counseling was provided, a wheel chair ramp was built, among other things. The results included some coming to faith in Christ, goodwill built with the family and friends, and some actually joined our church so that they could be involved in this ministry of care. Our church was known for several things, one of which became, “They’re the church that serves everybody and anybody in time of crisis.”

So here’s a goal that will bless your city: commit to visiting and praying for every person stricken by tragedy. The tragedy doesn’t have to be physical injury. In our local newspaper I read weekly, if not daily, of hardships in families. A local mayor’s portrait was on the front page because he was accused of soliciting sex for money. A grandmother went to prison because she embezzled from her employer. A family was ripped apart when a grandson murdered his grandmother. The list goes on. But questions that a local church needs to ask are, “Does this family have a church? Do they have a pastor? Let’s visit them and pray for them and see how we might show them God’s love.”

When I surrendered to ministry leadership a pastor told me that if I would minister to hurting people I would never lack for ministry opportunities. He was right. But I also learned that I couldn’t do it by myself. I needed to lead our church to organize and to do this in our ministry field.

Often when we discuss ministry goals we talk budgets and baptisms and attendance in public worship and Bible study. These are important matters to consider. But mostly they are the byproduct of other things. Things like leading a church to pray for Kingdom concerns and mobilizing outreach ministries of various kinds. Through ministries like http://www.Pray4EveryHome.org every member of your church can pray for their 100 closest neighbors. Through My316 and God Space you can teach your church how to share the Gospel and minister to people (these are provided to every NWBC church without cost thanks to the generous Cooperative Program missions giving of our churches).

How about this as a goal: We will pray for missionaries, the lost in our community, city and school leaders, and all of the children in town, in every public gathering of our church. That is Kingdom praying –praying for the city, unbelievers, and the missionaries we send and support. If we don’t pray for Kingdom concerns when we gather as church, Kingdom praying won’t happen in the homes of most church members.

Things like this make me excited for the spiritual possibility present in every church. Whether you gather with 20 or 200 on Sunday, these are the kinds of things you can do that will touch heaven and human hearts and will make a difference in your city. God told the people in Jeremiah’s day, living as exiles in Babylon, “Seek the welfare of the city I have deported you to. Pray to the LORD on its behalf, for when it has prosperity, you will prosper” (Jere. 29:7). That is a good word for us, living in a 21st Century Babylon.

2018 A Year of Kingdom Growth in the Northwest

Standard

Twenty-nine new Northwest Baptist (NWBC) churches and a fifth consecutive annual increase in Cooperative Program (CP) missions giving mark continued growth in the mission of NWBC churches. Additionally, the Northwest Impact Missions Offering recorded the largest annual increase in decades, totaling $136,691, or $39,837 above the 2017 offering of $96,854. Growth in numbers of churches and missions giving doesn’t tell us all we need to know about our spiritual health, but they are indicators that our Kingdom footprint in the Northwest is expanding.

First, consider these facts about the 29 new churches (including new church plants, affiliates and campuses). Thirteen new churches are in Oregon and 16 are in Washington. About half of these churches are in the Portland and Seattle metro areas, and half are in other cities and towns. The size of the communities range from a few thousand to hundreds of thousands. Two of the 29 churches worship in the Arabic language, one in Russian, one in Zomi, another in Cambodian, five in Spanish, one in Korean, another in Vietnamese, and 17 in English. That’s new churches in eight different languages, all in one year!

How does this happen? The same way it did in the First Century. Some planted, others watered, and God gave the increase. It takes churches, pastors, and missionaries, all working together, empowered by the Holy Spirit, to see the Kingdom advance, and especially cross-cultural, multi-linguistic, Kingdom advance. We need the SBC system of seminaries and mission agencies; we need churches, associations and conventions, all working together, each doing their part, to effectively and consistently penetrate lostness in the Northwest.

Great Commission work is never accomplished by “me and Jesus and no other.” It’s always Jesus and me and many others. Paul had Barnabas and Timothy and Silas, but he also had the Church at Antioch, later joined by churches in Philippi and Ephesus and many others.

Second, CP missions giving in 2018 totaled $2,849,089, for an increase of $35,863 over 2017. With CP missions decreasing nationally, it is remarkable that we have experienced five consecutive years of growth in the Northwest. This, together with significant growth in our Northwest Impact Mission Offering, puts us in a strong position as we train leaders, start and strengthen churches, and do missions, including Disaster Relief missions, in 2019.

Speaking of missions, please pray about joining your fellow Northwest Baptists in sending a team of 130 people to Asia in July 2019. We will minister to hundreds of our overseas workers and their children. More information about this mission opportunity is included elsewhere in the Witness. Paula and I will be there, as will others from throughout the Northwest. In 2016 we sent 163 from 32 churches, so I’m confident we can do this by God’s grace and through faith in Him.

This is an opportunity for rejoicing, Northwest Baptists, and for giving God praise and glory for the great things He has done. Together we see God working mightily in our day, this good day He has given to us.

Northwest/Texas Baptist Partnership

Standard

From our earliest days Northwest Baptists have enjoyed the partnership of Texas Baptists. Legendary church-starting pioneer, Leonard Sigle, came from Texas to serve FBC, Klamath Falls as pastor in 1930. When he died 46 years later, he had started 58 churches in the Northwest, California and Nevada. R. E. Milam, the first Executive Director-Treasurer of the NWBC, Lewis Steed, Cecil Sims, Ted Cotton, Harry Bonner, Bill Crews, and many others came to the Northwest from Texas. I like to say that the West begins in Texas and ends in the Pacific Northwest! (Apologies to our friends in Alaska and Hawaii)

In our 2018 Annual Meeting, Northwest Baptists rekindled our partnership with Texas Baptists by signing a three-year partnership agreement (2019-2022), renewable for an additional three years. In this agreement we have the opportunity to both give and receive from our Texas friends. The agreement focuses on four primary emphases:

1. Northwest Church Planting
2. Collegiate Ministry with a focus on Metro-Seattle Collegiate Ministry
3. Mutual Pastoral Training and Renewal
4. Joint Missions Partnership with a focus on the Rio Grande River Ministry

Regarding church planting, the purpose is to form a strong alliance between the Baptist General Convention of Texas and the Northwest Baptist Convention to accelerate growth in the number and strength of disciple-making churches in the Northwest. The BGCT will provide funding to some church plants, but mostly the partnership will happen as the 5,300 Texas Baptist churches partner with our church plants. It will also include association-to-associate partnerships. We have come a long way in the Northwest, starting with 15 churches and growing to almost 500 since 1948, but we need 3,000 churches to equal the density of churches in Texas. The Northwest remains one of the least churched and evangelized areas of our nation.

Regarding collegiate ministry, the BGCT will help to provide a viable, sustainable ministry to the vast collegiate and university population in the Seattle/Tacoma Metro area. A strategic component to this vision is identifying the person and developing support for a Metro-Seattle Collegiate Ministry Coordinator. With more than 300,000 students attending the many colleges and universities, there is currently no organized Baptist collegiate ministry effort in the Metro-Seattle area, and there is no local person who has this ministry responsibility.

Regarding pastoral renewal, we will develop cross-cultural training for Texas Baptist pastors, helping them to visit and learn from innovative ministries in the Northwest. This includes a multi-day training in a Northwest location. Many Texas pastors will benefit from the cross-cultural exposure available in the Northwest. The Northwest’s “pre-Christian” cultures make it a good training ground for missional engagement.

Regarding a joint mission partnership, Texas Baptists invite Northwest Baptists to join them in their River Ministry. The purpose is to enable NW Baptist churches to serve in the Rio Grande Valley to impact both sides of the river with Gospel. This includes two venues (1) ongoing mission work with the river ministries, (2) training in the Valley Mission Education Center in Harlingen, TX. The current immigration crisis has opened the door for humanitarian and evangelistic outreach along the border region of Texas.

Specific ways in which you can participate in this partnership will unfold over time. Most importantly, as we celebrate Christmas peace and joy, we can also express gratitude that it is a good day to serve the Lord in the Northwest, and it is a good day to share our blessings with our Texas Baptist friends.

Contemplations as Northwest Baptists Prepare to Gather in Our Annual Meeting

Standard

Several hundred Northwest Baptists will gather in our annual meeting on Nov. 13-14, 2018, at the Great Wolf Lodge near Chehalis, WA. As we prepare to gather, worship, and celebrate what God is doing in and through us, consider the following “meditation:”

The only person present in every epoch and on each Bible page is God Himself. Every scene in Scripture is dominated by His presence. From Eden to the Flood, from Abraham to Moses to Gideon to Peter, Paul and Mary, God alone dominates history’s script.

And yet, from the beginning God created human beings as His “imagers” on the earth. Because every person is created in the image of God, and tasked with representing Him, every person has his or her “day” to serve and glorify God. Many of God’s imagers fail to image Him fully because of sinful self-destruction and gross unbelief, and we all fall short of glorifying God fully because of sin. Some of God’s imagers have their day cut short, chopped off before their lives lift off. The evils of child-killing and the bloodshed of war destroy many souls created by God to image Him in the subduing and governing of all earthly creation.

But those who know the God in whose image they are made have the miraculous possibility of making the day in which they live, a small speck of time in the large swath of human history, a day that will count for all of eternity. Indeed, those who know God in their day will know God from their day forward, for all eternity. That makes the day in which we live, and the opportunity it affords, stupendous beyond the imagination of our feeble minds.

Consider this – the child in your church who comes to faith will mature into an imager of God whose prayers are heard by heaven! That child who is led by you to love Jesus is a child who will never be alone. Never will that child be orphaned or abandoned in the world. That child will one day be launched as a missionary missile to teach school, or image God in business or politics or constructing houses or raising children of their own who will live to His glory. And no matter what next week brings, or the years beyond that, a child who knows Jesus will enjoy all of eternity with God and the hosts of heaven in a “forever family.”

The student in college who is seeking life’s purpose and meaning is led down the path to knowing God by a Jesus-follower, and is surprised by the joy of meeting the God in whose image they are made. Through your ministry and witness their life becomes anchored on the Truth they never knew existed.

Families in your town are desperately trying, or barely trying, to provide spiritual and moral guidance to their children. Most are doing the best they can with what little they know. Then the church steps into their lives, and the truth of Christ enters their thinking, and faithful witness is lived in their presence, and love for neighbor (and love for enemy) is experienced deeply, and in a moment, or in the course of time, they are reborn. Their family is created anew. Peace and joy and the blessing of God enter their home. Marriages are saved. Children are rescued from a misspent life. All because a church, or a believer … you … lived for Christ in your day.

In the Northwest there are many people seizing the opportunity presented by God in this day. Northwest Baptists are gathering for worship and Bible study on Sunday, and serving in schools and on jobsites throughout the week. One church is teaching English as a Second Language (ESL) in a Buddhist temple, and they share the Gospel of Jesus Christ as they teach ESL! Others are fully participating in community celebrations so that they can “rub elbows” with their neighbors, build friendships, and share the living hope of Jesus. Prisoners are visited. The hungry are fed. The lost are led home. Almost 2,000 people followed Jesus in believer’s baptism through the ministry of our churches last year. Churches are striving, struggling to live and love and share the good news of Christ in their day.

So as messengers gather from our Northwest Baptist churches, we do so with gratitude to God for what He is doing. We gather in the knowledge that together we strive to make the most of our day. And we gather in the firm belief our day is a good day to serve the Lord in the Northwest.

This is Our Day

Standard

In another day, on April 13, 1948, messengers from 15 Northwest Baptist churches met in Portland, OR to organize the Northwest Baptist Convention (NWBC). They believed that together they could more effectively reach the Northwest for Christ. By 1952 there were 53 churches in the NWBC. There were 291 churches by 1972 (some of these were in Canada). Strong growth has continued over the past 40 years through sharing the gospel, training leaders, and gathering new believers into churches. Today we have 485 churches in the NWBC. The Canadian Convention separated from the NWBC in 1985 and became its own SBC affiliated convention numbering several hundred churches.

In our day the work of the NWBC is much the same as it has always been. Our churches cooperate together in ways that maximize our effectiveness in key areas of Kingdom work. So how does your NWBC serve our churches in this, our day?

First, we put a priority on training leaders. Monthly pastor clusters is one of the large pieces of this training. The clusters focus on the spiritual life of the leader and the spiritual health of the church. They study and discuss disciple-making, evangelism, worship planning, and much more. We also support the Pacific Northwest Campus of Gateway Seminary as a primary method of training leaders. Currently I am teaching preaching to 17 students at our PNW campus. Added to this is training for Bible teachers, worship leaders, Disaster Relief volunteers, college ministers and others. We train transitional “interim pastors” and help churches in their search for pastors. Training leaders is something that we best do cooperatively, understanding that no single church can do broad-based training on their own.

Second, we prioritize evangelism. The NWBC provides evangelistic training and resources to every NWBC church. The Cooperative Program (CP) mission giving of our churches makes this possible. We continue to provide My316 evangelism materials to our churches. At our annual meeting this November 13-14, 2018 we will launch a new resource available to every church, without cost, because we believe that making disciples should be at the center of ministry for every church.

Third, we help start new churches. Currently we have churches worshipping in about 27 different languages in communities of all sizes. Churches are started in urban and rural areas, from cities to small towns. I am personally involved in a new church in a town of 8,000 people. The church launches on September 30, but already we have had a young man come to Christ and receive water baptism. With only one church for every 23,000 in population in the Northwest we need many more churches in many more places.

Fourth, we do missions beyond the Northwest. Through the CP and other mission offerings we support missionaries in over 100 nations. Also, the NWBC has a special partnership in East Asia in which many of our churches have participated. During July 10-23, 2019, we will bring about 130 people from our NWBC churches to serve hundreds missionaries and their children in a retreat in Asia. We are the only state convention of churches to ever do this, and this will be the third major retreat in which we serve our missionaries in this way.

You are making an enormous difference through your involvement and support of the NWBC, and we have much left to do. This is our day! And it is a good day to serve the Lord in the Northwest!